The Next Phase of ALM: SD Times ALM Buyer’s Guide Recap

As the software delivery industry continues to evolve and mature, the challenge of managing the growing list of the tools and processes becomes more daunting every day. Today, Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) platforms are proving most valuable by providing the governance, management and coordination for every stage of development, deployment and release. Recently, I spoke with Madison Moore at SD Times about the changing market and where ALM is headed.

Here’s an overview of what we discussed:
Software innovation is real, and it’s becoming faster. It’s imperative that teams rid themselves of any cultural or structural restraints in order to stay competitive, and this includes limiting the tools and techniques dev teams can use. In the next phase of ALM, teams must leverage the best-of-breed tools they need in order to deliver software innovation faster. “The tools shape the daily activities, the activities shape the culture, the culture shapes the practices and force the previously established processes to find a new model that works to explain, support or inspire practices and promote more collaboration with the extended team members.” In that vein, we are always reimagining what ALM really is.

With larger and more diverse teams now responsible for delivering software—due to the rise of DevOps and Agile practices—a challenge has arisen in the inability for some older development tools to scale appropriately. To combat this, organizations need utilize flexible, comprehensive platforms that provide more holistic views of the entire lifecycle. As I mention in the article, “When they are partnering in the selection of an ALM solution, [developers] should insist on a platform that allows them to use their tool set as it exists today or that allows them to migrate to different tools, or adopt new tools as they change the way they operate.”

As a category, ALM is always evolving; it’s important to constantly reevaluate specific ALM practices to ensure they’re adaptive to change. While ALM has never been about inflexibility, some organizations are daunted by the idea of changing practices that have previously been successful.  Yet it’s imperative that CIOs reassess their ALM practices to ensure they are not obstructing innovation.

Read the original article here.

Flint Brenton

Flint has extensive experience leading innovative software companies and has an exceptional track record of accelerating growth through product innovation and sales execution. Most recently, he served as president and CEO of AccelOps, a provider of a leading IT operations analytics platform for cloud and virtualized infrastructures. Prior to that, he served as president and CEO of Tidal Software, a leading application automation software solution provider, which later was acquired by Cisco. After the Cisco acquisition, Mr. Brenton served in various follow-on capacities, including Vice President of Advanced Services and as Senior Vice President of Engineering for Cisco’s cloud-based Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) software offerings. At both AccelOps and Tidal Software, Mr. Brenton more than tripled sales under his tenure while focusing both companies on disruptive product introductions.

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